A DAY BY THE SEA

Last week, we were invited by UKIE to present Ashta at the Games Funding Conference in Liverpool. It was a fantastic opportunity to meet people developing, financing and distributing games in the UK and also a wonderful chance to introduce the youngest member of our team to a vital aspect of game development: presenting ideas.

Carmen joined LUDINC for a work experience as part of her International Baccalaureate. She wanted to spend time with us because she especially loves working with children. I was happy to have Carmen with me not just because she did a fantastic job but also because I value her curiosity and unique point of view.

Most new titles that are released are a testament to the fact that a large number of games are still made for male consumers. Our industry needs fresh perspectives and diversity to continue to thrive which is why I would love to see more young women in games. If you are currently considering a career in games I would like to hear from you.

A NEW HOME FOR LUDINC

Today marks the beginning of an exciting new chapter for our company. We have closed our offices in Berlin and found a new home in the city of Bristol in the beautiful south west of England. Why did we leave our beloved Berlin? There are a number of reasons but everything began with Professor S.:

When Professor S. made its debut, it received widespread acclaim and awards both nationally and internationally. Schools and teachers loved the idea and our growth in German primary schools is testament to that. However, we noticed that teachers were often struggling with ageing computers and poor internet connections.

In order to improve the situation, we formed a partnership with Open-Mesh in the US to provide low cost WIFI solutions and improve connectivity in the schools. Still, many schools were struggling to finance and maintain those solutions. But help was at hand: Johanna Wanka, Germany’s minister for education and research announced a five billion euro package to kickstart digital education in Germany.  

Sadly, in the summer of 2017 it became clear that no concrete provisions were made inside the government to secure adequate funding for the initiative and support from the ministry quickly fizzled out. Even though most people agree that progress in digital education needs to be made and Angela Merkel has shown renewed support earlier this year, small companies like ours struggle to survive in a climate of political uncertainty.

But there is a more fundamental, philosophical reason underlying our decision to move to England. In the United States and the United Kingdom, it is easier to create innovations because there is an understanding that to make something new one has to take risks. While in continental Europe – Germany and France in particular – there is a perception that risk is something to be avoided.

Both positions have merit in that the former creates a frequently booming industry based on new ideas while the latter creates an economically more stable environment resting on the foundations of tried and tested concepts.

It is easy to see that LUDINC, as an innovator in education technology would thrive in a climate where entrepreneurship is encouraged and nurtured. Clearly, there are more advantages to being here and I will say more about those in later posts. 

Naturally, we will continue to provide our German customers with the same great products and services they have come to expect from us and we look forward to doing the same for our new friends and partners in the UK.

A day at the children’s media conference

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Last week I was in Sheffield for the Children’s Media Conference. I was invited to talk about Professor S. as part of a panel called “Innovation in Education”, of which there is a very nice summary report here.

The event was very well organised and it had a cosy and welcoming feel to it. It was encouraging to see how many great projects were presented there. I only stayed for a day but I saw plenty of interesting talks and also made some great contacts.

The keynote speech that evening by cartoonist Chris Riddell was very entertaining. He took us on a journey through his career, working method and his opinions about the recent referendum, which unsurprisingly also featured prominently in the talk about European financing the following morning.

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Although Creative Europe says in a recent statement that there will be no substantial changes until 2017, the mood among UK producers was sombre. After all, it will be hard to finance future british stories without EU support.

As a UK citizen living in Germany, I am personally affected by the changes that may come out of the referendum. Moreover, I am sad to see the country I call my home now ever more distant.

In recent years my world has shrunk through affordable air travel, free video calls and freedom of movement. Communication is easier than ever in part because English has become a common global language. As a result, I have friends from all over the world who also socialise and do business globally.

In my mind, physical borders have already lost in importance and I doubt I would miss them if they disappeared tomorrow.  After all, we all share one planet and would therefore benefit from sharing resources and growing understanding and tolerance more than we would stand to loose from distancing ourselves from our fellow human beings.

The film industry in particular benefits from the free movement of people and ideas and many projects would be difficult to realise without drawing on talent from other countries.

Time will tell how this decision will affect us in the long run but I have no doubt that interesting times lie ahead.